How to Get Inexpensive Medical and Dental Insurance

Contrary to popular belief, inexpensive medical and dental insurance is not a thing of the past. You can get it now, if you know where to look and what to get.

Comprehensive Medical Insurance Plans

Comprehensive insurance plans cover your ongoing health care needs and are the most expensive plans. They include:

* Indemnity Plans. These are the traditional insurance plans that cover your doctor visits, hospital fees, and prescription drugs. These plans let you use your own doctor and hospital, and are the most expensive of the comprehensive insurance plans.

* Managed health care plans (HMOs, PPOs, POSs). These plans assign you to a health care group – doctors, hospitals, and specialists – that you use for your health care needs. Some of these plans let you use your own doctor and hospital for an additional fee. They are the least expensive comprehensive insurance plans.

* Medical saving accounts. These plans combine a tax-sheltered savings account with a high-deductible health insurance plan. The savings account is used to pay for minor medical expenses and the insurance pays for more expensive medical expenses.

Specialized Health Insurance Plans

Specialized health insurance plans cover only specific health care needs. They are the least expensive insurance plans. They include:

* Major medical insurance plans. These plans are high deductible health insurance plans that provide coverage for major illnesses such as heart attacks and cancer.

* Hospital and surgery plans. These plans provide coverage for hospital stays and surgical services only. They cover doctor fees, room and board, lab tests, and X-rays.

* Hospital confinement plans. These plans pay a set amount for each day you spend in the hospital.

* Short term plans. These are comprehensive health insurance plans with coverage that lasts for a specified amount of time.

* Accident only plans. These plans pay for doctor visits and hospital fees when you have an accident. They do not cover illnesses or diseases.

Dental Insurance Plans

Standard dental plans pay for dental services such as teeth cleanings, fillings, extractions, crowns, and X-rays. Indemnity dental plans allow you to see the dentist of your choice, and managed dental plans assign you to a group of dentists.

Dental plans are less expensive when they are part of a health insurance plan. You also have the added benefit of having only one insurance bill and one company to deal with.

Medical and Dental Practices “Feeling the Pain” Along With Their Patients

In this day and age rarely a day goes by that Americans are not inundated with articles, radio and television reports, and even conversations at the grocery store about Healthcare. And while most everyone has an opinion and it is a pretty good guess that the debate will continue over rising costs, insurance coverages, covered programs, and governmental intervention the fact remains that many who need care are simply not being provided. Revolving credit is not new for many operations in the Healthcare industry. Offices may have one or more options including credit cards. But for a host of reasons the credit card, for many, may not be the desired way to pay for services rendered. There are some programs out there for the dental and medical fields, but the fact is that these programs are often restrictive and does not benefit the medical professional and / or their clients. Practices are losing valuable patients and revenues while their patients, in many cases, are neglecting the care or procedure they need.

Is there an answer? Yes, in many cases. There will always be some guidelines as to whom can attain credit and there should be parameters. Anyone who has been around for the past five years or so has seen the negative impact on our economy that is a by-product of not having boundaries in place for credit decisions. However, there are some new players out there with eyes on helping consumers, taking a “Refreshingly Different” approach and are working with medical and dental professionals to offer a wider array of financing that will benefit both the practice and the patient.

Recently, this growing problem of denials was studied within the industry. As mentioned there are a select number of medical care companies offering revolving services to patients. While these credit grantors are established in this special marketplace and engrained in the healthcare industry their turn down ratios are quite alarming. Recognizing the need to finance more persons in need while working in cooperation with the office just makes a lot of sense. This is the “caring” business and perhaps new alternatives to the ‘same old, same old’ is what is needed and who’s time has come. Office and Practice managers are very busy professionals, but if they are willing to look at new programs that are easy to use and offer support to help them on an ongoing basis, perhaps a better situation for the Practice and its patients can emerge.

A Brief History of Medical and Dental Scrubs

The use of a special medical uniform for surgical and other procedures was not normal practice until the early part of the twentieth century. Surgical procedures often took place in large amphitheatres where medical students could observe the operations being carried out by the physicians. In most cases the surgeons wore everyday street clothing during the procedure, except sometimes the surgeons donned butchers’ aprons to protect their clothes. In those days the importance of sterility was not recognized, so instruments and supplies were not commonly sterilized. The sutures used for closing wounds were usually just gut string sewn with a normal sewing needle which was reused over and over. Even the gauze employed to cover the wound was often nothing more than remnants taken from cotton mill floors.

The sea change in medical dress came after the Spanish flu pandemic in 1918 in which twenty million people died; together with the rise of Lister’s theory of antisepsis. The beginning of special medical dress was surgeons and other medical personnel wearing masks, which was done more to protect the physician from the patient’s illness rather than to protect the patient. At this time too heavy rubber gloves began to be used by medical staffers to protect themselves from harsh chemicals used in cleaning the medical environment. By the nineteen forties, with the awareness of how wounds can become infected and of the need to have a sanitary environment in the operating room, medical staff professionals began wearing white uniforms during surgery and routinely in their daily rounds.

The first medical scrubs in wide use were white drapes or gowns which covered the surgeon and medical assistants during operations. The white colored fabrics used in these scrubs symbolized cleanliness. However, it was soon found that white clothing worn against a background of white sheets and a white surgical environment often caused eyestrain. It was in the nineteen fifties and sixties that medical and dental scrubs, usually of a green or blue color which is more restful to the eyes and also doesn’t show bloodstains as readily, came into widespread use. Soon designers of medical apparel began experimenting with different colors and styles of scrubs, and by the nineteen eighties it was possible for medical professionals to select from a wide array of colors and fashionable designs. Today’s medical scrubs range from cheap nursing scrubs to elegantly designed coordinated outfits suitable for street wear; and from short sleeved, V neck shirts with drawstring pants to formal jackets and gowns. Fabrics used for medical scrubs come in a wide range of solid colors, and feature bright prints (which are popular among medical professionals who work with children). Durable fabrics, which are easy to clean, are among the most popular.